skip to main content
Healtheuniversity > English > Diabetes College > Eat Healthy > Read Food Labels > Nutrition Claims

Nutrition Claims

There are two types of nutrition claims.

  • Nutrient content claims tell you about the amount of a nutrient in a food.
  • Health claims tell you how a food can improve your health when you eat it as part of your healthy diet.

Know what different nutrition claims mean to help you make healthier choices.

Some packaged foods have nutrition claims.

There are two types of nutrition claims:

  1. Nutrient content claims: Nutrient content claims tell you about the amount of a nutrient in a food. These claims can help you choose foods that have a nutrient that you may want less of (such as sugar) or that you may want more of (such as fibre).
  2. Health claims: Health claims tell you how a food can improve your health when you eat it as part of your healthy diet. See this example of a health claim from Health Canada: "a healthy diet containing foods high in potassium and low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure, a risk factor for stroke and heart disease".

Nutrition claims follow rules from Health Canada. These rules make sure the claims are used in the same way on all food products. These claims only tell you about a few key nutrients. Read the nutrition facts table to make food choices that are best for you.

Examples of Nutrition Claims

"Cholesterol free" or "No cholesterol"

  • What it means: A very small amount
  • Where you might see this claim: Potato
  • Beware: Cholesterol only comes from animals. Cholesterol free products may still be high in fat.

"Low fat"

  • What it means: A very small amount of fat. 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • Where you might see this claim: Fruit bottom yogurt
  • Beware: Low fat does not mean low in sugar. Choose low fat yogurt with no sugar added.

"No sugar added"

  • What it means: Sugar has not been added to the product.
  • Where you might see this claim: Juice
  • Beware: Juices are high in calories and have natural sugar.

"Light"

  • What it means: Foods that have less fat or calories (energy).
  • Where you might see this claim: Light peanut butter
  • Beware: Light can also mean the colour or texture such as "light" or "lite" olive oil.
Last Reviewed: 10/16/2016